Category Archives: 19th-century letters

William Clift’s correspondence with Elizabeth

While I was preparing for my presentation and working on my paper, I though it would be a good idea to tell a few things about William Clift’s correspondence with his eldest sister Elizabeth. In 1792, William arrived in London … Continue reading

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Thou Shalt Not Cross

After Annemiek’s presentation on Penholder’s Everbody’s Letter Writer, I started to think about crossing again. Earlier in this blog, there was a post by Annemiek on what Penholder wrote about the reasons for not crossing letters. Reasons for crossing were either that … Continue reading

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Robert Browning and “the full stop”

Punctuation marks had to be acquired and properly applied in writing as long as the writer is acquainted with their rules.  On the basis that treatises on punctuation were scarce and grammars used to deal with this “art” briefly, punctuation … Continue reading

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Self-corrections and prepositions

This week, we are reading Anita Auer’s article on self-corrections in Late Modern English letters (Auer 2008). In this article, Auer discusses three case studies, and one of them concerns the letters of Lucy Whitaker (1759-1837), the wife of a … Continue reading

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Letter Drawings?

After having finished an essay on gender variation, I started reading through the Browning Letters again (taking it a couple of letters at a time). Their letters are filled with humorous phrases: “to dramatic impersonations, gruff with nature, “gr-r- you … Continue reading

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Fanny Burney in King’s Lynn

King’s Lynn is a small town on the coast of Norfolk in England, about 45 miles North of Cambridge. It used to be one of the four major English harbours, and it has a Hanseatic connection as well as several … Continue reading

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The Carlyle Letters Online

While browsing through my bookmarks looking for letter corpora, I re-encountered a great resource: The Carlyle Letters Online. This digital archive contains over 10,000 of the collected letters of the important Victorian couple Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. The content … Continue reading

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The Clift Family Correspondence

While I was searching for an interesting topic for my paper, I came across a book named Letter Writing as a Social Practice. I am interested in the Clift family letters and I explicitly want to focus on William Clift’s written interaction (and … Continue reading

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The Penny Black Stamp

When reading the ‘Browning Love Letters” I noticed that a “Penny Black” postage stamp was adhered to its envelope. The Penny Black was the first stick on -postage stamp ever used. I knew of its existence, but not when it … Continue reading

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The varying degree of formality in John Wesley’s letters

This gallery contains 10 photos.

In the course Letters as Sociohistorical-Linguistic Documents, we have learned that social status was of great importance in the late modern English society. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that especially experienced writers applied a variety of different styles to … Continue reading

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