Monthly Archives: October 2012

The relative pronoun which in the Clift Family Correspondence

Frances Austin (1985) points out in her paper named Relative Which in Late 18th Century Usage: The Clift Family Correspondence that the relative pronoun which in the eighteenth century was not predominantly used for inanimate objects (pp.15-29). Instead this relative … Continue reading

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Letter Drawings?

After having finished an essay on gender variation, I started reading through the Browning Letters again (taking it a couple of letters at a time). Their letters are filled with humorous phrases: “to dramatic impersonations, gruff with nature, “gr-r- you … Continue reading

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Fanny Burney in King’s Lynn

King’s Lynn is a small town on the coast of Norfolk in England, about 45 miles North of Cambridge. It used to be one of the four major English harbours, and it has a Hanseatic connection as well as several … Continue reading

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The Carlyle Letters Online

While browsing through my bookmarks looking for letter corpora, I re-encountered a great resource: The Carlyle Letters Online. This digital archive contains over 10,000 of the collected letters of the important Victorian couple Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. The content … Continue reading

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Children’s letters again…

When searching for information on children’s letters on the internet, I found a fantastic site which offers a variety of books that can be accessed freely online. I was searching the archives for children’s correspondences and I found this book:   … Continue reading

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Richardson’s letters in Italian

A few years ago, Donatella Montini, from the Sapienza Università of Rome, published an edition of letters by Samuel Richardson which focused on the making of Clarissa. For this edition, which came out in 2009, she translated a selection of … Continue reading

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Molly short for Mary?

When I first started working on Robert Lowth’s letters, and in particular on the letters he had written to his wife Mary, I happened to tell a colleague about them. The colleague was surprised to find that Lowth’s private name … Continue reading

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