Tag Archives: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Gender differences in politeness

In her second blogpost, Jiayan Xu reports on her findings from the essay she wrote to round off the course The Sociolinguistics of Late Modern English Letters: My term paper was about discovering gender differences in terms of politeness theory, taking the … Continue reading

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“Your ever attached …”

Below follows Marlies Reitsma’s second blogpost: I remembered seeing an unusual subscription in a letter written by Elizabeth Barrett Browning a while ago. I searched for the subscription again in the digital collection of the Browing Letters and found it: Your ever … Continue reading

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Call me ‘Ba’

While doing research on the correspondence between Elizabeth Barrett Browning (EBB) and Sir Uvedale Price in the Browning Letters corpus published online by Baylor, I came across an interesting development in opening formulas. Sir Uvedale and EBB met when he was … Continue reading

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Children’s letters from EBB

Here is Christel Brouwer’s first blogpost: While looking through the Browning Letters corpus (Baylor) I found two very interesting children’s letters from Elizabeth Barrett Browning (EBB). The first letter was written in 1814 by an 8-year-old EBB, and it contains … Continue reading

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Terms of endearment in the nineteenth century

Ana Revan is another student in the Late Modern English letters course. This is her first blogpost. Nowadays we see people on TV use a wide range of pet-names for their loved ones, and we do the same ourselves in our … Continue reading

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Thou Shalt Not Cross

After Annemiek’s presentation on Penholder’s Everbody’s Letter Writer, I started to think about crossing again. Earlier in this blog, there was a post by Annemiek on what Penholder wrote about the reasons for not crossing letters. Reasons for crossing were either that … Continue reading

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The Greatest Love Story Ever Told…

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I am not talking about Romeo and Juliet, Lancelot and Guinevere or Paris and Helena. These two are not as widely known, but their story “is surely one of the most fascinating love-stories in the world” (Kenmare 1957:7). This is … Continue reading

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