Author Archives: Ingrid Tieken

Periphrastic do and Colonial Lag

And since she sent me both blogposts all at once, here is Esther Spaanderman’s second one, also on the Adams Papers: “But as I speak french very imperfectly and she understands not a syllable of English I suppose she did … Continue reading

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Dont vs. don’t: early American usage?

Esther Spaanderman is the last of my students who owes us her blogposts. Here is the first one: A while ago, I studied periphrastic do in the letters of John Adams (1735-1826), the second president of the United States. As … Continue reading

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In Search of Jane Austen reviewed

I’ve just, that is, on the first day of ICEHL-19 in Essen, been told about yet another review of the book, by Nuria Calvo Cortés from the Universdad Complutense de Madrid. The review appeared in the journal Atlantis, and (to my … Continue reading

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Excitement or illiteracy?

Here is Sopio Zhgenti’s second blogpost, once again on Virginia Woolf: The previous blog post I wrote was about Virginia Woolf and the nicknames she used with people close to her. This time, I would like to continue talking about … Continue reading

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The Adams Family Papers

The Adams Family is a popular topic in this blog. Here is another blogpost on them, Martijn Slokker’s last one:  When I wrote my course paper, I worked with the Adams Family Papers, an electronic archive which contains (among other … Continue reading

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Jane Austen: a very polite correspondent

Merel Kohsiek’s second blog post is on a comparison between the language of Charlotte Brontë and that of Jane Austen: For my analysis of the language of grief in Charlotte Brontë’s letters (see also my previous blog post), I did a … Continue reading

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The Brontë sisters’ pseudonyms

Merel Kohsiek wrote her first blogpost on the Brontë sisters’ pseudonyms, and how Charlotte’s identity was revealed: Charlotte Brontë is now known mainly for her novel Jane Eyre, but her contemporaries did not know her as such. The novel was published under … Continue reading

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