Monthly Archives: October 2012

Pauper letters

Anyone interested in pauper letters will come across Thomas Sokoll’s book Essex Pauper Letters, 1731-1837, published in 2001. An online review of the book came out in HistoricalSociolinguistics/Sociohistorical Linguistics two years later. But the book is also cited as important introductory reading … Continue reading

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The Greatest Love Story Ever Told…

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I am not talking about Romeo and Juliet, Lancelot and Guinevere or Paris and Helena. These two are not as widely known, but their story “is surely one of the most fascinating love-stories in the world” (Kenmare 1957:7). This is … Continue reading

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Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience

During the last few weeks of the course Letters as Sociohistorical-Linguistic Documents, I’ve been reminded of the many special linguistic insights which letters are able to provide. We’ve read,* for example, about how letters may provide evidence for reconstructing social … Continue reading

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Penholder’s Everybody’s Letter Writer

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Today I received a surprise package in my mail! Of course, I remembered ordering a copy of Penholder’s Everybody’s Letter Writer: being a Complete Guide to Letter Writing, but the website (abebooks.com) had told me that it would take 10 to … Continue reading

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Not yet transcribed letters

While searching the internet for not yet transcribed letters, I found a link to an interesting website called Letter Archive Project. This site shows transcribed and not yet transcribed letters from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. The letters … Continue reading

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Children’s letters

As I am interested in why children wrote letters  between the 17th and 19th century, apart from the fact that it was considered something children should be taught among the higher classes, does anybody have an idea of where to … Continue reading

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Warburton’s language

There are 13 letters in the Leiden University Library by William Warburton (1698–1779), who is described by the ONDB as ‘bishop of Gloucester and religious controversialist’. One of the people he entered into a controversy with was Robert Lowth (1710-1787). For a … Continue reading

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